Cape Verde

Cape Verde

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2020, become a model for zero emissions on a global scale and a knowledge hub for several sub-regions.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Windpower
  • Implementation: Cape Verde is an island country spanning an archipelago of 10 volcanic islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. It is located 570 kilometres off the coast of Western Africa. In 2006, its Government adopted a law which sets out licensing procedures for independent power producers and auto-producers. In 2011, it determined a more detailed renewable energy policy framework to include a roadmap on how to reach the 100% RE target. The decision was based on scientific based discussions on the benefits of the goal. The high dependence on imported fossil fuels to meet its energy demand meant that a shift to 100% renewable energy was needed – especially as energy demand is predicted to rise. The Cape Verde government thus decided to invest renewable energy generation in order to not only provide electricity to inhabitants directly, but to also produce desalinated water, extend the energy grid, and provide energy storage options. To gain public support for the energy transition, the government held public consultations which were held in each of the four islands where wind projects would be built. Meanwhile, comprehensive Environmental and Social Impact Assessments were conducted. Local landowners were engaged in the siting of the projects and a consideration about securing grazing rights underneath the wind turbines was included in the course of involving the island's livestock herders.
  • Population: 539,560 (2016)
  • Area: 4,033 km2 (1,557 sq mi)
  • Link: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/partnership/?p=2271
Cape Verde

Kasese, Uganda

Kasese, Uganda

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2020
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Biomass, solar, geothermal, and micro-hydro
  • Implementation: Kasese District is located in Western Uganda. It is bordered by several protected forest reserves including Queen Elizabeth National Park and Mt. Rwenzori National Park. Only 7.6% of the 134,000 households in the district have access to the national grid. Limited road access make connecting to the grid virtually impossible. Nearly all households burn wood and charcoal as their main source of energy. Most use kerosene (also called paraffin) to light their homes. In 2012, Kasese District Council launched a 100% renewables program with the aim of bringing access to clean energy services for all domestic, productive and social needs in rural and urban areas, all by 2020. The program would ensure that renewable energy access is integral in all government-funded projects and institutions, including schools, health centres, markets and other public infrastructure. Tax breaks are made available for all renewable-energy-related businesses. Traineeships are provided for the installation, maintenance and distribution of renewable energy technologies. The council is also working with universities, businesses and NGOs to implement smaller localised RE projects. A collaboration between WWF and Barefoot Power Uganda is allowing local businesses to provide loans for small-scale solar in mountain villages. The partnership's "Light Up a Village" program has brought 240 solar home systems to Kasese.

    Today renewables are estimated to supply 26.8% of the Kasese district with energy. Solar for lighting and biogas for cooking has replaced the traditional three-stone method of cooking – reducing indoor pollution. Cheap domestic solar systems now provide electricity for many, freeing up money for food, clothing and education. Increasing electrification has meant more reliable lines of telecommunication that enable solar phone charging facilities and solar-run computers with internet access. The district now plans to convert its streetlights to use efficient LED lighting.

    The number of new businesses and jobs in the green economy has increased. Businesses sell solar equipment, maintain solar networks, build biogas systems, install modern cook stoves and construct mini-hydro projects. The tourism industry has grown as newly electrified camps and lodges are attracting more visitors. To achieve the 100% target, Kasese will still require support for the existing program and innovative finance mechanisms maintained over many years for households – especially those living on less than $1 a day.
  • Population: 700,000
  • Area: 3,389.8 km²
  • Link: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/oct/20/ugandan-mayor-my-district-will-be-100-renewable-by-2020
Kasese, Uganda

Réunion, France

Reunion

  • Target: 100% renewable electricity by 2030.
  • Status: In progress - Renewable energy represents 13% of the primary energy consumption.
  • RES: Main sources of electricity generation are hydropower, photovoltaics and biomass (bagasse). Photovoltaic energy represents 8% of the production. From 2011 and 2015 solar parks increased in 44%. Trials for solar micro-grids with storage capacity for areas within the island that are very difficult to access.
  • Implementation: Multiyear program for energy (Projet de programmation pluriannuelle de l’énergie), which has a legal precedent on the Energy Transition Act for Green Growth (Loi sur la Transition Energétique por la Croissance verse) forms the basis of target. The project is being implemented by the EDF Group.
  • Population: 866,506
  • Area: 2,511 km²
  • Link: https://www.theclimategroup.org/partner/region-la-reunion

 

Reunion

Valley View University, Accra, Ghana

Valley View University, Accra, Ghana

  • Target: 100% renewable energy
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar energy and biogas
  • Implementation: Valley View University is located in Accra, the capital of Ghana. In 2001, it became the first ecological university in Africa. An ecological master plan was the basis for the sustainable campus. Developed 10 years prior, the master plan outlines an architectural and urban planning framework that works to conserve land use and energy, as well as to create closed nutrient and water cycles that support the local economy. It focuses on sustainable and resource-saving buildings; water and nutrient cycle management; ecologically sound treatment of landscape; large and connected green areas on campus with high biological activity; improvement of microclimate by means of bioactive zones; and activation of bioactive zones using local plants, retention swales and ditches, and human fertiliser.

    Today, the technological concept serves as a regional and international pilot model. The university features a range of energy technologies. Electricity is generated from rooftop solar panels, and kitchen and sewage waste is converted to energy at the on-campus biogas plant. As part of its sustainable campus development, the university offers a degree program in ecological studies. According to the International Climate Protection Initiative, the estimated investment into the project was 1.3 million euros.
  • Population: approx. 10,000 students
  • Area: 3120-hectare (296.5 acre) university campus
  • Link: https://ecology.vvu.edu.gh
Valley View University, Accra, Ghana