Canberra, ACT, Australia

Canberra, ACT, Australia

  • Target:100% renewable electricity supply by 2020.
  • Status: In progress - 47MW renewable energy capacity (2013) in Australian Capital Territory (ACT).
  • RES: Wind and solar farms.
  • Implementation: Canberra covers the 100% through auctioning, meaning the purchase of electricity from several wind and solar farms. Until 2017, the government commissioned three solar and three windfarms to respectively provide 44MW and 200MW, accounting for 60% renewables. Additional 200MW wind and 50MW solar capacity are to cover the interim target of 90% by 2020. Increased annual electricity bills by 2020 are to be partly compensated by annual average savings  through the free replacement of downlights. Investments will be made in renewable research programmes and training, as well as the building of headquarters and maintenance facilities . So far, AUD $400 million local investments have been achieved in the auctioning process.
  • Population: 410,301
  • Area: 814.2 km²
  • Link: https://www.environment.act.gov.au/energy/cleaner-energy/renewable-energy-target-legislation-reporting

 

Canberra, ACT, Australia

Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia

Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia

  • Target: 100% RE by 2030, with an interim target of 25% in 2020 and 50% in 2025.
  • Status: In progress -  In 2014 already 39% of all Coffs Harbour households or businesses have installed rooftop solar PV systems.
  • RES: Solar power and energy-efficient street lighting
  • Implementation: Coffs Harbour City Council set a 100% RE as a corporate, organisational target for itself in March 2015. Although the target did not apply to the rest of the city area, its aim was to make the Council a role model of sustainability to the Coffs Harbour area. The Council committed to reducing annual corporate CO2 emissions by 25% on 2010 levels by 2020 and by 50% by 2025. In 2004, it was the first council in Australia to introduce energy-efficient street lighting across its entire local government area. In 2010, the Council installed the largest public rooftop solar power array in NSW on the top of Rigby House which saves $30,000 per annum in electricity costs. It has also installed solar panels at the local Botanic Gardens. In October 2013, Council adopted a Climate Change Policy. It adopted an energy fund for investment into efficiency works and renewables that will be financed through 10% of the difference in costs between the black and green energy purchased by Council, or AUS$100,000 a year, whichever is the greater. A Coffs Harbour Emissions Reduction Plan (CHERP) has been effective from January 2016, which sets out a framework on how the Council monitors, reviews and reports on its emissions and RE.
  • Population: 70,000 (2017)
  • Area: 1,175 km2
  • Link: https://www.coffscoastadvocate.com.au/news/council-sets-ambitious-energy-and-emissions-target/2579807/
Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia

Lismore, NSW, Australia

Lismore, NSW, Australia

  • Target: Generate 100% of the City Council's electricity needs from renewable energy sources by 2023.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar photovoltaic and thermal systems, hybrid wind and solar-powered off-grid streetlight.
  • Implementation: The 100% RE target set by Lismore City Council is a corporate target rather than one applied to the entire city area. The decision of the City Council was made in 2013 after an 18-months community consultation, which resulted in the community expressing the wish for Lismore to become a model of sustainability, starting with the Council itself reaching the 100% goal. The City Council's response was  to develop the 2023 Renewable Energy Master Plan in 2014, which would include various action plans. The Plan would involve two important stages. First, energy consumption should be significantly reduced with a range of energy efficiency measures, such as switching to LED lighting and installing solar PV and solar hot water systems at Council-owned sites. Second, a large-scale 3.8-4.7 MW solar plant should be constructed. In 2014, Lismore awarded a tender to Nickel Energy to install 166kW of solar PV which should save nearly $100,000 a year in electricity costs. The city also took advantage a Community Energy Efficiency Program (CEEP) which was established by the federal government of Australia to support local councils and community organisations in improving the energy efficiency of buildings, facilities and street lighting as well as delivering community education. The city conducted energy efficiency upgrades in buildings and facilities. It soon became the first local government in Australia with hybrid wind and solar-powered off-grid street lighting. Meanwhile, the energy efficiency upgrades has reduced electricity consumption within five years by 22%. Since 2013 the council has also been working together with the 'Farming the Sun' initiative to create Australia’s first community-owned solar farm consisting of two 100kW solar PV systems using a community-funded loan. Finance for the projects is being sourced from local community investors.
  • Population: 27,569 (2016)
  • Area: 1,290 km2
  • Link: https://www.lismore.nsw.gov.au/cp_themes/default/page.asp?p=DOC-QMM-54-48-20
Lismore, NSW, Australia

Tasmania, Australia

Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2020.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Hydropower, windpower, rooftop solar photovoltaics.
  • Implementation: In 2013, the Tasmanian Government launched a climate action plan the "Climate Smart Tasmania: A 2020 Climate Change Strategy" which outlined the 100% target for the reduction of carbon emissions and help communities adapt to climate change. Based on research and consultation, the plan focused on energy efficiency in existing buildings, monitoring emissions and biodiversity, efficient water use, reducing barriers to utilising renewable energies, training Tasmania’s workforce, electrifying public transport as well as managing and reducing natural hazard risks in the state. By 2014, Tasmania already achieved 93% due to its large hydropower resources. The state did come close to reaching the 100% with wind energy alongside 70MW rooftop solar power. However systems were affected by an energy crisis in December 2015. Between September 2015 and April 2016, the state suffered record low rainfalls, affecting hydropower generation. In December, Tasmania had to return to the production from fossil fuels when the Basslink interconnector with the Australian mainland also failed. However, in May 2016, Tasmania announced that the island was fully powered by renewable energies. Diesel generators and the gas turbine were switched off as heavy rains eased the energy situation. The Energy Supply Plan was subsequently updated to ensure flexible energy generation by prioritising renewable energy sources, with gas and diesel maintained only as a backup system.
  • Population: 526,700 (2018)
  • Area: 68,401 km² (26,410 sq mi)
  • Link: https://reneweconomy.com.au/tasmania-labor-pitches-120-renewables-target-rooftop-solar-boost-34727/
Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia

Uralla, NSW, Australia

Uralla, Australia

  • Target: Become a decentralized, off-grid town, meeting 100% of the town's energy demand via local renewable energy generation.
  • Status: In progress - 10% of electricity from solar photovoltaics.
  • RES: Solar photovoltaics
  • Implementation: Reduce the town's energy needs  via energy efficiency upgrades to buildings and infrastructure. Change user behaviours in order to minimise personal and household energy usage. Increase the amount of local renewable energy produced in Uralla to provide for all of the community’s energy demand. The company ZNET assisting the town with the planning has worked on projects in Germany and North America. The ZNET plan focuses on renewable energy generation and integrating renewable energy technologies. It will take around 5-10 years to complete.
  • Population: 6,034
  • Area: 193.5 km²
  • Link: https://zneturalla.org.au

 

Uralla, Australia