Samoa

Samoa

  • Target: 100% RE goal by 2017.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Five hydropower stations, solar and wind power facilities. Hydropower is the most cost effective renewable energy to develop in the country. The island uses solar energy to complement hydro sources during the dry season, and coconut oil for biodiesel generation.
  • Implementation: The Pacific Islands Greenhouse Gas Abatement through Renewable Energy Project (PIGGAREP) has been implemented in the pacific region since 2006, funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). This project involves the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Most of these countries have a 100% renewable energy target. The Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change (PIFACC) provides the framework to guide cooperation amongst stakeholders in the pacific region. To facilitate action on the ground, Samoa is working with the Asian Development Bank and New Zealand.
  • Population: 195,843 (2016)
  • Area: 2,842 km² (1,097 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.asrec.net
Samoa

Solomon Islands

Solomon Islands

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2030
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar energy, hydro schemes on rivers, and biomass energy.
  • Implementation: One of the least developed countries in the world, the Solomon Islands consists of over 997 islands from which 97 are inhabited. The six main islands are Guadalcanal, Malaita, Makira, Santa Isabel, Choiseul, and New Georgia. The major activities in the islands are agriculture and fishing. The islands possess mineral, hydro and forest resources. The Solomon Islands are currently experiencing the severe effects of climate change, with extreme weather conditions, rising air temperatures on flora and fauna, and rising sea levels. Like most pacific islands countries, Solomon Islands is heavily dependent on fossil fuels for its transportation system and diesel for its power generation. The country, however, is now turning to renewable energy to replace these fuels. The country´s national Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification is implementing energy schemes to promote the use of renewable energy. The government has initiated renewable energy projects in rural communities, with donor support to promote rural electrification and the use of solar power. Notable projects include the use of solar for power generation in schools. In 2019, an agreement to build the Tina River hydropower project was signed which will  increase the amount of renewable energy in the Honiara national grid by nearly 70 percent while reducing reliance on expensive diesel power. The project is Solomon Island’s first large-scale infrastructure project to be developed as a public-private partnership (PPP), involving the Solomon Islands Government, the state-owned power utility Solomon Power and the private developers of the project, Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-water) and Hyundai Engineering Corporation (HEC). Support is also being received from the World Bank. The Solomon Island's government is working towards addressing challenges in reaching its energy goal in general, which include: the lack of technical skills, little or no renewable energy training available locally, and the lack of legislation for Renewable Energy Service Companies (RESCOs).
  • Population: 599,419 (2016)
  • Area: 28,400 km(11,000 sq mi)
  • Link: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2018/12/06/agreements-signed-to-bring-reliable-renewable-electricity-to-solomon-islands
Solomon Islands
  • Malaita Island © Irene Scott/AusAID CC BY 2.0

Tasmania, Australia

Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2020.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Hydropower, windpower, rooftop solar photovoltaics.
  • Implementation: In 2013, the Tasmanian Government launched a climate action plan the "Climate Smart Tasmania: A 2020 Climate Change Strategy" which outlined the 100% target for the reduction of carbon emissions and help communities adapt to climate change. Based on research and consultation, the plan focused on energy efficiency in existing buildings, monitoring emissions and biodiversity, efficient water use, reducing barriers to utilising renewable energies, training Tasmania’s workforce, electrifying public transport as well as managing and reducing natural hazard risks in the state. By 2014, Tasmania already achieved 93% due to its large hydropower resources. The state did come close to reaching the 100% with wind energy alongside 70MW rooftop solar power. However systems were affected by an energy crisis in December 2015. Between September 2015 and April 2016, the state suffered record low rainfalls, affecting hydropower generation. In December, Tasmania had to return to the production from fossil fuels when the Basslink interconnector with the Australian mainland also failed. However, in May 2016, Tasmania announced that the island was fully powered by renewable energies. Diesel generators and the gas turbine were switched off as heavy rains eased the energy situation. The Energy Supply Plan was subsequently updated to ensure flexible energy generation by prioritising renewable energy sources, with gas and diesel maintained only as a backup system.
  • Population: 526,700 (2018)
  • Area: 68,401 km² (26,410 sq mi)
  • Link: https://reneweconomy.com.au/tasmania-labor-pitches-120-renewables-target-rooftop-solar-boost-34727/
Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia

Tokelau

Fakaofo, Tokelau

  • Target: 100% renewable energy
  • Status: Achieved
  • RES: 1MW off-grid solar energy system across three main atolls of Tokelau. The project includes : 4032 solar modules, 196 string inverters, 112 DC charge controllers, 84 battery inverters and 1344 batteries in 48V banks. The system allows for up to 2 days of energy without any solar input.
  • Implementation: Tokelau consists of three small coral atolls located about 500 km north of Samoa. It is a small island nation with limited land resources, fairly isolated, with only one form of transportation available and a very mobile population. Like many Pacific Island countries, it is heavily dependent on fossil fuels, especially diesel. The target was put in place in response to growing affects of climate change, and for its government to replace the use of fossil fuels with solar and bio-fuel to generate power on the island. An off -grid solar energy system is currently in operation, and was design and constructed, in collaboration with the local Tokelau community, by private companies and development organisations.
  • Population: 1,499 (2016)
  • Area: 10 km2 (3.9 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/Tokelau.pdf
Fakaofo, Tokelau

 

Tuvalu

Tuvalu

  • Target: Achieve 100% renewable electricity and increase energy efficiency by 30%, by 2020
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar photovoltaics, and biogas from pig manure.
  • Implementation: In 2009, the government of Tuvalu adopted the National Energy Policy (NEP) setting out its 100% target. The National Energy Policy includes a mechanism which is analogous to a Renewable Portfolio Standard, which relies on most projects being funded by external development assistance, on a bilateral basis with the Tuvalu Electric Company. Action began with a 40 kw rooftop solar system that supplies 5% of the capital city of Funafuti's power. The plant was donated by e8, a non-profit organisation comprising 10 electricity companies from the G8 countries. Next was the installation of 46 kilowatt solar power system on a local secondary school for an estimated cost of US$800,000. The island also makes use of biogas from pig manure. With the support of ADEME and UNDP, a training program for biogas installation was put into effect. It is estimated that US$20 million is needed overall to reach the country's target. In 2013, the government signed on the Majuro Declaration by the Pacific Islands Federation, reaffirming its commitment and providing further details into its strategy. Tuvalu established the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Unit within the Tuvalu Electricity Corporation (TEC) in partnership with the New Zealand Aid Programme. The Unit  helps Tuvalu to develop its development strategy further. In January 2014, the World Bank approved a US$7 million grant from its International Development Association for the Tuvalu Energy Sector Development Project (ESDP) to support Tuvalu’s goals. The project includes a Gender Scoping Study, and a Gender Action Plan and Monitoring and Evaluation Framework which aims to ensure equal input into the project's design and implementation as well as equal share into the benefits of renewable energy, by both men and women. In April 2015, Solarcity and Infratec Renewables installed a 170kW of solar photovoltaic system on two Government owned buildings in Funafuti. This US$780k project is expected deliver 5% of the island's energy demand.
  • Population: 11,192 (2017)
  • Area: 26 km2 (10 sq mi)
  • Link: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2015/01/26/tuvalu-efficient-renewable-energy
Tuvalu

Uralla, NSW, Australia

Uralla, Australia

  • Target: Become a decentralized, off-grid town, meeting 100% of the town's energy demand via local renewable energy generation.
  • Status: In progress - 10% of electricity from solar photovoltaics.
  • RES: Solar photovoltaics
  • Implementation: Reduce the town's energy needs  via energy efficiency upgrades to buildings and infrastructure. Change user behaviours in order to minimise personal and household energy usage. Increase the amount of local renewable energy produced in Uralla to provide for all of the community’s energy demand. The company ZNET assisting the town with the planning has worked on projects in Germany and North America. The ZNET plan focuses on renewable energy generation and integrating renewable energy technologies. It will take around 5-10 years to complete.
  • Population: 6,034
  • Area: 193.5 km²
  • Link: https://zneturalla.org.au

 

Uralla, Australia

Vanuatu

Vanuatu

  • Target: Transition to renewable energy balanced with energy efficiency to stimulate green growth.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar energy, hydropower and geothermal, coconut oil for biofuel.
  • Implementation: Vanuatu is a nation of the South Pacific Ocean comprising around 80 islands. Located on the border of the Indian-Australian and the Pacific Plate, many islands are of volcanic origin and surrounded by coral reefs. Its economy is based on small-scale agriculture, tourism and fishery. Despite deforestation, the islands are covered with jungle and agricultural land (51,9%).  About 20% of urban dwellers and 83% of rural residents lack access to electricity. The country is vulnerable to environmental degradation and climate change risks such as seas level rise. In response, Vanuatu created the Ministry of Climate Change in 2013, and launched "National Energy Road Map (NERM) for 2013 to 2020" by following examples of similar countries, with technical assistance of the World Bank. The road map was updated to "NERM 2016 to 2030" after Vanuatu was hit by Hurricane Pam in 2015. The new map would detail the central role of renewable energy balanced with energy efficiency and introduces the economic opportunities for green growth. The map formulates five key priorities of the energy sector: access through grid extension and micro-grids, petroleum supply for transport, affordability, energy security and climate change mitigation. Implementation would be achieved through governmental leadership, empowered and accountable energy institutions and a sector-wide approach following the principle “Many Partners, One Team, One Plan”.  A Green Energy fund would foster energy projects by the national private sector. Several international investors would also be involved. The energy plan has since led to projects in geothermal, hydropower and solar energy being deployed by Australia, Austria, Italy and the European Union. One notable example is the wind park at Devil’s Point which covers around 7% of the capital island’s energy demand.
  • Population: 270,402 (2016)
  • Area: 12,189 km2(4,706 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/Vanuatu.pdf
Vanuatu

Yackandandah, Victoria, Australia

Yackandandah, Victoria, Australia

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2022
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar power and battery systems.
  • Implementation: The north-eastern Victorian town of Yackandandah in Australia recently noted the production of 1GWh of locally generated renewable energy, thus reaching the half-way point of its transition to 100 per cent renewables by 2022. Led by community energy organisation Totally Renewable Yackandandah (TRY), the town has installed solar and some battery systems, on over half of its households and community buildings. TRY's second solar purchasing offer (with battery storage) was recently launched in partnership with Mondo Power, a subsidiary of network operator AusNet Services to help communities shift to renewables. Work is also underway on a state government funded mini-grid project which will trial the use of solar, storage, and smart controls to manage network security along a Single Wire Earth Return (SWER) power line. An earlier mini-grid in the town was installed in 2017, linking almost 200 homes fitted with a combination of rooftop solar, battery storage, and smart controls. Today, the town has two functioning micro-grids, allowing customers to share power amongst themselves. TRY is now working with the local community to set up a community owned energy retailer, which will help the town reach the 100 per cent target.
  • Population: 950 (2011)
  • Link: https://onestepoffthegrid.com.au/victorian-town-notches-up-1gwh-of-locally-generated-renewable-energy-on-road-to-100/
Yackandandah, Victoria, Australia