Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Bamiyan, Afghanistan

  • Target: To supply power to remote communities.
  • Status: In progress - The Bamiyan Renewable Energy Program (BREP) developed a large-scale, solar photovoltaic (PV) mini-grid, and by 2017 began generating 1 MW of electricity to more than 3,500 businesses, homes and government offices.
  • RES: Solar PV with battery storage and diesel backup.  BREP uses a prepaid, pay-as-you-go model to collect revenue, with each house being equipped with a digital meter.
  • Implementation: The mini-grid was funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and built by a joint venture of two New Zealand companies, Sustainable Energy Services International (SESI) and NetCon. After construction, project developers transferred the system to Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS), Afghanistan’s national utility that now owns and operates the system. SESI and NetCon helped DABS operate the system for the first year after installation.
  • Population: 100,000
  • Area: 35 km²
  • Link: https://www.usaid.gov/energy/mini-grids/case-studies/afghanistan-hydropower

 

Bamiyan, Afghanistan

Bozcaada, Turkey

Bozcaada, Turkey

  • Target: 100% renewable electricity
  • Status: Achieved
  • RES: 17 turbine wind farm, solar arrays, hydrogen energy.
  • Implementation: Bozcaada is an island of Turkey in the northeastern part of the Aegean Sea. It currently generates more power than it consumes. In 2000, a 17 turbine wind farm was constructed with a nominal power capacity of 10.2 MW energy, and produces 30 GWh of electricity every year. This is the equivalent consumption of 17,500 households or 30 times the consumption of the whole island of Bozcaada. The excess electricity produced is fed to mainland Anatolia through an underground and partly undersea cable. The hospital and governor’s mansion on the island uses hydrogen energy produced by local renewable energy sources. At the governor’s mansion, energy is captured with a rooftop 20 kW solar array and a 30 kW wind turbine. The electricity produced is used to electrolyze water into hydrogen. This gas is stored compressed and used later to generate energy or as fuel in hydrogen-powered cars.
  • Population: 2,465 (2012)
  • Area: 42.63 km2 (16.46 sq mi)
  • Link: http://www.globalislands.net/greenislands/index.php?region=6&c=58
Bozcaada, Turkey

Fukushima, Japan

Fukushima, Japan

  • Target: Cover a minimum of 100% of primary energy demand with renewable resources by 2040
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Windpower, solar thermal heating, photovoltaics, biomass for power and heating, geothermal energy, and hydropower.
  • Implementation: The prefecture of Fukushima is located in the Tōhoku region on the east coast of Japan on the island of Honshu. The Great East Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunami and disaster at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 motivated the people of Fukushima to re-examine their energy system and ways of restoring industry in the shattered region. This led to the vision of transitioning to renewable energy as a way forward. Fukushima now has officially committed to cover a minimum of 100% of primary energy demand in Fukushima with renewable resources by 2040. Part of this plan involves taking advantage of strong offshore wind by building a large floating wind farm off the coast of Fukushima. The total cost of the farm is estimated to be  ¥18.8 billion (approx. $189 million USD). Still, the first 2 MW turbine was delivered in 2013. In 2015, Phase 2 was completed, bringing online two 7 MW wind turbines.

    By 2020, the goal is to have 143 large wind turbines totalling 1 GW in capacity 10 miles off the Fukushima coast. The massive size of turbines will call for them to be locally constructed, which means local jobs in manufacturing and maintenance. With its existing automotive and airplane industries, useful components to the wind turbine industry will be available. The Fukushima plan also envisions other technologies and resources, including solar thermal heating, photovoltaics, biomass for power and heating, geothermal energy, and hydropower. Fukushima Prefecture has held several educational and industry events to attract support for its renewable energy plan.
  • Population: 1,877,876 (2018)
  • Area: 13,782.76 km(5,321.55 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/03/11/national/fukushima-powers-toward-100-goal-renewables-grid-cost-woes-linger/#.XHP93C2ZOIY
Fukushima, Japan

Hokkaido, Japan

Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan

  • Target: 100% energy self-sufficiency by 2050.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Wind and biomass energy.
  • Implementation: Hokkaido is the second largest of the four main Japanese islands, and the largest of its 47 prefectures. Hokkaido is recognised as having great potential for renewable energies, notably wind energy and biomass.  Its economy is based on agriculture and the timber industry (22% of Japan's forests is located on the island). According to a 2011 study by the Japanese Ministry of Environment, the island has the potential to generate a quarter of the whole country’s renewable energy production, with half of it from onshore and a quarter of it from offshore wind power generation. Several pioneer projects have already implemented on the island since 2001. Among those facilities are the first community-based wind power installation in Japan. Indeed Hokkaido's efforts began on March 11th, 2011 when the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster strengthened the will of Hokkaido’s citizens to transition to a non-nuclear society. It triggered the creation of the Hokkaido Energy Transition 100 Project, a project which quickly released a step-by-step roadmap to 100% renewable energies for electricity production on the island through energy efficiency and community based production of energy.  In 2010, Hokkaido Island still relied mainly on nuclear power (43,8%), and thermal power (33,8%). The share of renewable was of 22,9%, where hydro power constituted 22,1%. The Hokkaido roadmap would diversify the renewable energy sources of the island with solar, biomass, geothermal and especially wind power generation. The roadmap would also outline short, mid and long term objectives to reach for energy efficiency: 17% of savings on 2010 basis in 2020, 29% in 2030 and finally, 60% in 2050. To achieve steady implementation, the Plan is promoting the sharing of best practices between inhabitants of the island. Since the beginning of the project, citizens and private businesses have been supporting the project, including the Hokkaido University Sustainable Low-Carbon Society Project. In May 2014,  the “Hokkaido Energy Change 100 Network” was founded with the aim of continuing the steerage of activities towards the 100% target.
  • Population: 5,377,435 (2016)
  • Area: 83,453.57 km(32,221.60 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/10/14/business/balance-power-shift-toward-renewable-energy-appears-picking-steam/#.XGQGSy3MyIY
Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan

Inje County, Gangwon, Korea

Seoraksan, Inje County, Gangwon, Korea

  • Target: 100% renewable energy by 2045.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: 6 MW of wind power and 1.7 MW of mini-hydropower.
  • Implementation: The county of Inje in the Province of Gangwon-do is located in the north of the Republic of Korea, bordering with North Korea. The rural county is covered with around 88% of forest. In 2015, Inje County developed the ‘Inje 2045 Zero Energy Independence Plan’, to transform itself into Eco Inje by transitioning to 100% by 2045. To achieve this target, Inje County is taking advantage of its natural environment, particularly its hilly landscapes and water resources. Its Plan would set out five main policy areas: 1) Expansion of New Renewable Energy production, 2) Energy Efficiency, 3) Energy conservation & Creation of Civic culture, 4) Expansion of Carbon Sinks, and 5) Building & Strengthening cooperative foundation. Some of the actions already implemented include 6 MW of wind power and 1.7 MW of mini-hydropower generation capacity. Inje's plan has been strengthened by adopting the best scenario through the '2015-2016 Energy-safe Cities' program in cooperation with ICLEI Korea and other relevant organizations in Korea. One of main challenges for Inje County remains the ability to create solid partnerships among relevant stakeholders such as the private sector, military and residents.
  • Population: 34,120 (2000)
  • Area: 1,646.33 km2(635.65 sq mi)
  • Link: http://kcc.iclei.org/newsdetails/article/jeonju-city-and-inje-county-committed-to-ambitious-energy-transformation.html
Seoraksan, Inje County, Gangwon, Korea

Jeju Province, Korea

Jeju Island, Korea

  • Target: 100% renewable electricity and transport, and to be a “carbon-free island" by 2030.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Onshore (350 MW) and offshore (1 GW) wind turbines, solar (30 MW), small hydroelectric power plants, and power storage systems. Electric cars, house energy management system (HEMS) and other technologies will also become available for the residents of the islands.
  • Implementation: Jeju self-governing province consists of several islands. In 2012, the Jeju Energy Corporation (JEC) of the Jeju province set the 100% target in order to be independent from the electricity imported from the Korean Peninsula, and to meet all its electricity demand by only renewable energy (RE) sources generated from within the islands. This initiative includes the replacement of the current fossil-fuel fired generator with RE technologies. The JEC aims to achieve the target by: (1) turning Gapa Island, a small island located South of Jeju, into a testing laboratory for Jeju to be the first carbon free island, (2) increase the share of renewable energy in the total energy demand to 50% by 2020, and (3) make Jeju Island a carbon-free city by 2030. The first step in switching Gapa Island to a carbon-free electric grid involved the municipality with central government agencies. The energy demand is met completely from wind turbines and solar photovoltaic systems. Electric vehicles for transport and HEMS have been placed in every household on the island. For the second and third steps, the Korean central government and from local investors will be investing in the installation of renewable energy technologies and smart grid trials. The Jeju Test-Bed for the Grid is a project that will function as a testing platform to improve the integration of RE and energy storage facilities within the grid. A total of 168 companies are participating in the project, which covers approximately 6,000 households throughout Jeju Island. The Jeju’s smart grid will be one of the world’s largest smart grid communities that will allow the testing of advanced smart grid technologies, offering opportunities for R&D, energy storage, and the development of new business models.
  • Population: 604,771 (2014)
  • Area: 1,849 km(714 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.ecowatch.com/south-koreas-plan-to-have-worlds-first-carbon-free-island-1891165990.html
Jeju Island, Korea

Kurimajima, Miyako City, Japan

Kurimajima, Miyako City, Japan

  • Target: 100% renewable energy
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar photovoltaics
  • Implementation: Kurimajima is a remote Japanese island, part of the Miyakojima Islands and municipality in the South of Okinawa prefecture. The island's only connection to the main island of Miyakojima is a 1,690-meter long bridge and is named after Kurima Island. The Miyakojima Islands are well known in Japan for their tropical landscape and turquoise blue sea. Today they are known as the energy transition pioneers in using small and autonomous energy systems. The 100% renewable energy target originated from the need to preserve local groundwater and ecosystem. The island has a rich and unique marine ecosystem and is one of the most popular islands in Japan for tourism. In 2008, its focus on protecting the environment was outlined in the Eco-Island Miyakojima Declaration. It defined clear goals to cut carbon emissions levels in the island: 40 percent in 2030 compared to 2003 carbon emissions, and 70 percent in 2050.  To achieve this, energy for heating, transport and electricity would come from renewable sources. To date, the island has installed many small-scale power systems, such as photovoltaic panel on houses or local businesses buildings. Solar power generation accounts for 380 kW and storage batteries for 100kW-176kW. A management system of the supply and demand has been tested since 2011  in collaboration with the company Toshiba. The involvement of the municipality and the knowledge of private stakeholders’ have helped build smart-community grids. These systems are working to stabilise energy supply on the remote island.
  • Population: 200
  • Area: 2,84 km²
  • Link: https://www.nedo.go.jp/content/100788811.pdf
Kurimajima, Miyako City, Japan

Mindanao, Philippines

Mindanao, Philippines

  • Target: Bring renewable, off-grid electricity and clean water to remote, conflict impacted communities in rural Mindanao.
  • Status: Achieved
  • RES: Solar photovoltaic (PV) battery chargers, PV solar home systems of 20-50 watt-peak, 210-300 watt-peak community PV systems for schools, health centers, and community centers, and 20-45 kilowatt micro-hydro systems.
  • Implementation: Since 2009, the Alliance for Mindanao Off-Grid Renewable Energy (AMORE) has supplied electricity to over 13,000 households in more than 400 barangays (villages) in 12 provinces, most of which are in the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao. AMORE is implemented by Winrock International and funded by the United States Agency for International Development, the Department of Energy, the former Mirant Philippines Foundation, and Sunpower Foundation. To be qualified for the program, communities have to be low-income but show potential for economic development, and be at least 5 kilometers from an existing electricity grid connection. The AMORE program trains local community members to manage and efficiently run their own renewable electricity installations. They would form Barangay Renewable Energy and Community Development Associations (BRECDAs), where citizens would build skills and knowledge necessary for community development. Each BRECDA chooses their own leaders and rules, raises their own money, and completes the proper government registration of their organization. Women and children are encouraged to participate, and BRECDAs organize locally and regionally to share best practices and resources. Through the AMORE program people also learn about the importance of water and other natural resources for their livelihood. Most of the program's projects have been funded by subsidised grants but AMORE is now helping local renewable energy providers to develop economically sustainable business models. One example of an AMORE project is Lam-Alis is a small rural community located in the province of Sultan Kudarat. The program helped create a 9 kilowatt, off-grid micro-hydro source for electricity using the local creek, supplying power to more than 80 households. The local people created a membership group called the Lam-alis Christian-B’laan Renewable Energy Association (LACREA) to administer the project, along with a clean drinking water program. LACREA collects PHP100.00 per month (USD2.3/month) for electricity and PHP10 each month (USD0.23/month) for water from community members who opt for the service. Failure to pay risks having electricity cut off. By March 2011, LACREA accumulated more than three hundred thousand pesos (USD7,000).  In addition to membership fees and electricity and water payments, the association earns extra income from a corn mill, a fish pond and a lending business, which they created to take advantage of the cheaper micro-hydro sourced electricity. LACREA is purchasing and lending out battery systems to households to connect to the micro-hydro plant.
  • Population: 25,537,691 (2018)
  • Area: 97,530 km2 (37,660 sq mi)
  • Link: http://edgedavao.net/bigger-picture/2017/11/07/renewable-energy-future-source-power/
Mindanao, Philippines

Palawan, Philippines

Palawan, Philippines

  • Target: 100% renewable energy
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Hydropower
  • Implementation: Palawan is an island province off the coast of the Philippines. In order to promote access to electricity, increase reliability, add local jobs, protect the island environment, and lower energy costs, the province has set a goal of being powered by 100% renewable sources. Currently, more than half the communities in the province are without electricity. Where electricity does exist, it is expensive, reportedly twice as costly as in Manila. It is also unreliable as Palawan is not connected to the mainland grid, and black-outs and brown-outs are common. To achieve its 100% renewable target, Palawan aims to attract renewable energy investors to help fund the costs of installation by easing planning processes and providing incentives such as tax breaks. In November 2014, it was announced that the energy department contracted with local power generation and construction firm AGPI to build 11 hydropower plants in Palawan totalling 131 MW. Palawan's renewable energy plan however is under threat by national government support of building a coal plant on the island, with diesel being the preferred alternative. There has been significant local opposition to the building of the plant, including criticism by environmental groups like World Wildlife Fund.
  • Population: 849,469 (2015)
  • Area: 14,649.73 km2(5,656.29 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.rappler.com/business/industries/173-power-and-energy/41998-palawan-renewable-energy-plan
Palawan, Philippines

Sumba Island, Indonesia

Sumba Island, Indonesia

  • Target: Electrify 95% of the island and exclusively provide  power from renewable energy until 2025
  • Status: In progress - 10% of electricity production from solar, biogas and hydro.
  • RES: Most of projects rely on solar PV, biogas, or micro-hydro systems.
  • Implementation: The Dutch global energy consultancy company KEMA had assessed the potential of wind and hydropower  to power the entire island with renewable energy at low costs. Based on this study and together with Hivos, a Dutch development organisation, the Indonesian Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources decided to implement the 100% renewable energy target on Sumba Island. Today, the Iconic Sumba project consists of a conglomerate of international donors and the local government. The Asian Development Bank as well as the Dutch and Norwegian governments also financially support the initiative.
  • Population: 755,849
  • Area: 11059.6 km²
  • Link: http://en.sumbaiconicisland.org
Sumba Island, Indonesia