Cook Islands

Cook Islands

  • Target: Eliminate carbon emissions by 2020.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar photovoltaic arrays
  • Implementation: The Cook Islands depend heavily on imported fuels and the cost of electricity based on these fuels is very high. Although nearly all households in the Cook Islands are connected to grid electricity, only 5.5% of households have additional solar photovoltaic systems installed, and 1% use small diesel generators. Several actions have taken place throughout the islands to increase the uptake of renewable energy. In the country's south, the Asian Development Bank's Ordinary Capital Resources has loaned US$11.19 to help fund solar projects. The EU has invested US$7.26 million, and the Cook Islands government has added an in-kind contribution of US$5.83 million. The total funding for the build out comes with an installation target in megawatts. The solar projects is expected to save 1.09 million liters of diesel consumption annually, and cut carbon dioxide emissions by 2,930 tons. This project will assist the Cook Islands government’s Office of the Energy Commissioner and the Renewable Energy Development Division in developing an energy efficiency policy implementation plan. In May 2015, the Government of New Zealand announced the completion of solar array projects in Rakahanga, Pukapuka, Nassau, Palmerston, and on the northern Cook islands of Penrhyn and Manihiki, where solar photovoltaic panels are expected to provide over 95 per cent of the electricity needs for the villages they connect to and deliver power to more than 230 homes and public buildings.
  • Population: 17,379 (2016)
  • Area: 236.7 km2 (91.4 sq mi)
  • Link: http://www.mfem.gov.ck/447-cook-islands-renewable-energy-chart-planning
Cook Islands

Niue

Niue

  • Target: 100% renewable energy target by 2020.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Solar thermal and photovoltaics
  • Implementation: Niue is the smallest island in South Pacific inhabited by 14 communities. There are only 400 occupied households. Farming and fishing are the two most important industries in the island - these receive development assistance from New Zealand. Due to its location, the island is often hit by a cyclone – around every four years –  causing huge physical and economic damage to the country. Its energy sector is hugely dependent on imported fossil fuels, which comes at a huge cost for the island as it uses diesel for generating power. In 2005, the country adopted the Niue Energy Policy and Energy Action Plan, which laid out its commitment to energy efficiency and renewable energy, in particular its 100% goals. The exploration of the country´s potential for renewables is not new and for many years Niue has been using solar water heating, such as is the case with local tourist accommodations. Since then further solar thermal systems have been installed, in particular EU program (2004-2006) which provided incentives for the installation of solar water heaters in households. In recent years, Niue has implemented three grid-connected solar PV systems, solar water heaters, and LPG gas stoves in homes, all installed at a subsidized cost since renewable energy technology was very costly, particularly for the pacific islands´ citizens. These systems were funded by the European Union. Today, electricity generation and energy efficiency programs on the island are managed by Niue Power Corporation (NPC), the national power utility. Major challenges for the island have been: complex requirements by financing institutions, lack of adequate technical capacity for projects maintenance, and limited knowledge of renewable energy. It has been observed that during the implementation of some EU-funded projects that the equipment used sometimes did not suit local conditions.
  • Population: 1,624 (2016)
  • Area: 261.46 km(100.95 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/Niue.pdf
Niue

Palmerston North, NZ

Square Edge, Palmerston North, NZ

  • Target: 100% RE city by 2015.
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: 3 wind farms (286 turbines), 4 mini-hydro turbines, bio-gas production, 100kW solar arrays, solar hot water heaters, insulation and hot water heat pumps.
  • Implementation: The city of Palmerston North is located near the southern end of New Zealand’s North Island. In 2011, the Palmerston North City Council (PNCC) began developing plans to become a 100% RE city. This goal was possible since wind farm development in the area had already begun in 1999, with three wind farms, including New Zealand’s largest, Tararua Wind Farm. Since 1999, a total of 286 turbines have been installed, with a combined annual capacity of approximately 300 MW, providing the city with access to renewable wind power. In addition to sourcing local wind power, the PNCC has invested in several other renewable generation projects. The installation of 4 mini-hydro turbines created enough energy to power the waste water treatment plant. The waste water treatment plant has also been retrofitted with technology allowing for the use of the waste water treatment’s bio-sludge for bio-gas production. The bio-gas produced from this process is used as a peak demand generator, capable of producing up to 75% of the city’s peak electrical demands. The PNCC has also installed a 100kW solar array on the roofs of the PNCC Central Administration Building and the City’s Convention Centre. As part of the city’s ongoing green house gas emission reduction plans, there are established financial assistance programs for improving the efficiency of residential properties. These financial assistance programs provide partial funding for solar hot water heaters, insulation and hot water heat pumps where applicable.
  • Population: 88,700 (2018)
  • Area: 395 km2 (153 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/107703079/palmerston-north-could-lead-use-of-renewable-energy
Square Edge, Palmerston North, NZ