Mindanao, Philippines

Mindanao, Philippines

  • Target: Bring renewable, off-grid electricity and clean water to remote, conflict impacted communities in rural Mindanao.
  • Status: Achieved
  • RES: Solar photovoltaic (PV) battery chargers, PV solar home systems of 20-50 watt-peak, 210-300 watt-peak community PV systems for schools, health centers, and community centers, and 20-45 kilowatt micro-hydro systems.
  • Implementation: Since 2009, the Alliance for Mindanao Off-Grid Renewable Energy (AMORE) has supplied electricity to over 13,000 households in more than 400 barangays (villages) in 12 provinces, most of which are in the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao. AMORE is implemented by Winrock International and funded by the United States Agency for International Development, the Department of Energy, the former Mirant Philippines Foundation, and Sunpower Foundation. To be qualified for the program, communities have to be low-income but show potential for economic development, and be at least 5 kilometers from an existing electricity grid connection. The AMORE program trains local community members to manage and efficiently run their own renewable electricity installations. They would form Barangay Renewable Energy and Community Development Associations (BRECDAs), where citizens would build skills and knowledge necessary for community development. Each BRECDA chooses their own leaders and rules, raises their own money, and completes the proper government registration of their organization. Women and children are encouraged to participate, and BRECDAs organize locally and regionally to share best practices and resources. Through the AMORE program people also learn about the importance of water and other natural resources for their livelihood. Most of the program's projects have been funded by subsidised grants but AMORE is now helping local renewable energy providers to develop economically sustainable business models. One example of an AMORE project is Lam-Alis is a small rural community located in the province of Sultan Kudarat. The program helped create a 9 kilowatt, off-grid micro-hydro source for electricity using the local creek, supplying power to more than 80 households. The local people created a membership group called the Lam-alis Christian-B’laan Renewable Energy Association (LACREA) to administer the project, along with a clean drinking water program. LACREA collects PHP100.00 per month (USD2.3/month) for electricity and PHP10 each month (USD0.23/month) for water from community members who opt for the service. Failure to pay risks having electricity cut off. By March 2011, LACREA accumulated more than three hundred thousand pesos (USD7,000).  In addition to membership fees and electricity and water payments, the association earns extra income from a corn mill, a fish pond and a lending business, which they created to take advantage of the cheaper micro-hydro sourced electricity. LACREA is purchasing and lending out battery systems to households to connect to the micro-hydro plant.
  • Population: 25,537,691 (2018)
  • Area: 97,530 km2 (37,660 sq mi)
  • Link: http://edgedavao.net/bigger-picture/2017/11/07/renewable-energy-future-source-power/
Mindanao, Philippines

Palawan, Philippines

Palawan, Philippines

  • Target: 100% renewable energy
  • Status: In progress
  • RES: Hydropower
  • Implementation: Palawan is an island province off the coast of the Philippines. In order to promote access to electricity, increase reliability, add local jobs, protect the island environment, and lower energy costs, the province has set a goal of being powered by 100% renewable sources. Currently, more than half the communities in the province are without electricity. Where electricity does exist, it is expensive, reportedly twice as costly as in Manila. It is also unreliable as Palawan is not connected to the mainland grid, and black-outs and brown-outs are common. To achieve its 100% renewable target, Palawan aims to attract renewable energy investors to help fund the costs of installation by easing planning processes and providing incentives such as tax breaks. In November 2014, it was announced that the energy department contracted with local power generation and construction firm AGPI to build 11 hydropower plants in Palawan totalling 131 MW. Palawan's renewable energy plan however is under threat by national government support of building a coal plant on the island, with diesel being the preferred alternative. There has been significant local opposition to the building of the plant, including criticism by environmental groups like World Wildlife Fund.
  • Population: 849,469 (2015)
  • Area: 14,649.73 km2(5,656.29 sq mi)
  • Link: https://www.rappler.com/business/industries/173-power-and-energy/41998-palawan-renewable-energy-plan
Palawan, Philippines